While the boats are at sea, they are constantly monitored by the Race’s two duty officers Ian Couch and Lee Fudge. They check in with the boats on satellite phone every day, and otherwise manage all the ongoing aspects of the Race.

 

Each day they also write a report of the activities at sea. Below is an extract from December 23rd written by Ian Couch:

 

Day 10, 23 Dec. Conditions are slowly dropping off now which has meant that we are getting calls from some crews complaining that it is slowing down and others pleased and wanting it to be slower!

 

Having made this crossing a couple of times I would be very pleased to have these seas and winds which, though challenging at times, are fast and certainly better than the head winds and storms of previous years. The most recent forecast shows a patch of light winds reaching most crews and passing through the fleet until around the 27th of December when they start to build again to fast conditions.

 

The expected issues are still impacting on some crews – power problems which means no auto-helms and limited systems for some (auto-helms are a recent luxury so not a show stopper) but all are managing to make water. As well as power problems some boats have been caught in confused seas meaning basic tasks like cooking and washing become difficult and they need extra effort.

 

The fleet Doctor is also communicating with a couple of crews and helping them resolve minor ailments but generally the fleet’s health is good.

 

The first Support Yacht has been visiting crews and will pass through the fleet in the next few days before dropping back to a position where she can move forward quickly if so required. A friendly face (and a photo opportunity for the crew), the Support Yacht’s ability to provide reassurance is extremely important.

 

We constantly talk about safety. The self-righting design of the boats, the need to be correctly tied on at all times, hatch discipline, stowing kit and countless other points are all essential. Last year there were numerous capsizes but in this race our first capsize happened today and went as well as a capsize can go. Crew and boat are all fine, undamaged and carrying on. If it was easy, if there was no chance of failure it wouldn’t be the experience it is!

 

As well as the tension, tiredness and drama we have had yet more reports of amazing wildlife encounters with dolphins and whales. As Day 10 draws to a close and a number of crews have done over 500 miles the fleet is doing well, the forecast is good and there is a real race going on!

 

And just received from ‘the high seas’, the below picture of crew member Alex Simpson was sentto us from the LATITUDE 35 team via satellite:

untitled1

Join the conversation at:
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Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Talisker/
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/talisker/

Click here to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

While the boats are at sea, they are constantly monitored by the Race’s two duty officers Ian Couch and Lee Fudge. They check in with the boats on satellite phone every day, and otherwise manage all the ongoing aspects of the Race.

 

Each day they also write a report of the activities at sea. Below is an extract from December 23rd written by Ian Couch:

 

Day 10, 23 Dec. Conditions are slowly dropping off now which has meant that we are getting calls from some crews complaining that it is slowing down and others pleased and wanting it to be slower!

 

Having made this crossing a couple of times I would be very pleased to have these seas and winds which, though challenging at times, are fast and certainly better than the head winds and storms of previous years. The most recent forecast shows a patch of light winds reaching most crews and passing through the fleet until around the 27th of December when they start to build again to fast conditions.

 

The expected issues are still impacting on some crews – power problems which means no auto-helms and limited systems for some (auto-helms are a recent luxury so not a show stopper) but all are managing to make water. As well as power problems some boats have been caught in confused seas meaning basic tasks like cooking and washing become difficult and they need extra effort.

 

The fleet Doctor is also communicating with a couple of crews and helping them resolve minor ailments but generally the fleet’s health is good.

 

The first Support Yacht has been visiting crews and will pass through the fleet in the next few days before dropping back to a position where she can move forward quickly if so required. A friendly face (and a photo opportunity for the crew), the Support Yacht’s ability to provide reassurance is extremely important.

 

We constantly talk about safety. The self-righting design of the boats, the need to be correctly tied on at all times, hatch discipline, stowing kit and countless other points are all essential. Last year there were numerous capsizes but in this race our first capsize happened today and went as well as a capsize can go. Crew and boat are all fine, undamaged and carrying on. If it was easy, if there was no chance of failure it wouldn’t be the experience it is!

 

As well as the tension, tiredness and drama we have had yet more reports of amazing wildlife encounters with dolphins and whales. As Day 10 draws to a close and a number of crews have done over 500 miles the fleet is doing well, the forecast is good and there is a real race going on!

 

And just received from ‘the high seas’, the below picture of crew member Alex Simpson was sentto us from the LATITUDE 35 team via satellite:

untitled1

Join the conversation at:
Twitter – https://twitter.com/TaliskerRace
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Talisker/
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/talisker/

Click here to subscribe to our YouTube channel.