After 15 full days on the water, the fleet is steaming towards Antigua and the leading boat (LATITUDE 35) has exactly 1,500 nautical miles to go. In hot pursuit is ROW 4 JAMES with 1,532 nautical miles to the finish line.

 

At an average of speed of 3.0 knots it should take them exactly 20 days. We have a real race on our hands, both of them vying to beat the 11-year-old fours record of all times, which stands at 36 days, 59 minutes and 30 seconds and/or the race record of 37 days and 9 hours (exactly)!

 

Here is an update from Atlantic Campaigns Duty Officer Ian Couch on events in the mid-Atlantic:

 

Nearly 3 weeks in and it has been a race unlike any other. Despite generally good conditions so far (no significant head winds or storms) things have been frustrating with very localised conditions. Some crews have had excellent following seas while others report awkward, confused conditions. Within a few hours there is dead calm and hard rowing, then a squall and rain, lightning and now ‘calima’ (the red dust from the Sahara causing overcast conditions and coating things with sand making it harder to generate power. This is also called ‘blood rain!).

 

In the next week, conditions continue to be mixed depending on where the crews are. Some are going to have very calm conditions but those in the north risk getting moved further north and possibly getting head winds a week from now. The advice for crews is to make south as much as possible whilst still making west.

 

We have had AIS and sat phone failure (fortunately we now insist on at least 2 phones), rudder pin issues and we are currently dealing with another rudder issue. Both the lead boats have had serious power problems meaning restricted use of on board systems. One boat, Rowers Ark, capsized, but Daryl has continued and is making good progress. The race doctor has been dealing with some minor illnesses and injuries and continues to be on call for all the rowers. The Support Yacht has visited a number of crews and has helped fix a rudder problem – but more of that in future updates.

 

A Adventures reported a very near miss (50-100m!) with a sleepy yacht, but this has been the only encounter we have been made aware of so far.

 

The reports of wildlife include lots of whales – some very close – numerous pods of dolphins, turtles, flying fish and there has been some successful fishing going on with fish on the menu for Facing It.

 

We continue to contact all the crews on a regular basis and are always here for their calls. Thanks to all the families and supporters who are encouraging the crews – please keep passing on the message: ‘stay safe, tie on, close hatches, clean yourself, maintain the boat, eat and hydrate – and don’t forget to enjoy it! (even the bad bits, because that is what makes it the greatest challenge!)’

gavan-hennigan1-copy

Join the conversation at:
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Click here to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

After 15 full days on the water, the fleet is steaming towards Antigua and the leading boat (LATITUDE 35) has exactly 1,500 nautical miles to go. In hot pursuit is ROW 4 JAMES with 1,532 nautical miles to the finish line.

 

At an average of speed of 3.0 knots it should take them exactly 20 days. We have a real race on our hands, both of them vying to beat the 11-year-old fours record of all times, which stands at 36 days, 59 minutes and 30 seconds and/or the race record of 37 days and 9 hours (exactly)!

 

Here is an update from Atlantic Campaigns Duty Officer Ian Couch on events in the mid-Atlantic:

 

Nearly 3 weeks in and it has been a race unlike any other. Despite generally good conditions so far (no significant head winds or storms) things have been frustrating with very localised conditions. Some crews have had excellent following seas while others report awkward, confused conditions. Within a few hours there is dead calm and hard rowing, then a squall and rain, lightning and now ‘calima’ (the red dust from the Sahara causing overcast conditions and coating things with sand making it harder to generate power. This is also called ‘blood rain!).

 

In the next week, conditions continue to be mixed depending on where the crews are. Some are going to have very calm conditions but those in the north risk getting moved further north and possibly getting head winds a week from now. The advice for crews is to make south as much as possible whilst still making west.

 

We have had AIS and sat phone failure (fortunately we now insist on at least 2 phones), rudder pin issues and we are currently dealing with another rudder issue. Both the lead boats have had serious power problems meaning restricted use of on board systems. One boat, Rowers Ark, capsized, but Daryl has continued and is making good progress. The race doctor has been dealing with some minor illnesses and injuries and continues to be on call for all the rowers. The Support Yacht has visited a number of crews and has helped fix a rudder problem – but more of that in future updates.

 

A Adventures reported a very near miss (50-100m!) with a sleepy yacht, but this has been the only encounter we have been made aware of so far.

 

The reports of wildlife include lots of whales – some very close – numerous pods of dolphins, turtles, flying fish and there has been some successful fishing going on with fish on the menu for Facing It.

 

We continue to contact all the crews on a regular basis and are always here for their calls. Thanks to all the families and supporters who are encouraging the crews – please keep passing on the message: ‘stay safe, tie on, close hatches, clean yourself, maintain the boat, eat and hydrate – and don’t forget to enjoy it! (even the bad bits, because that is what makes it the greatest challenge!)’

gavan-hennigan1-copy

Join the conversation at:
Twitter – https://twitter.com/TaliskerRace
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Talisker/
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/talisker/

Click here to subscribe to our YouTube channel.